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The Stone Chamber

By: H. B. Marriott Watson

It was not until early summer that Warrington took possession of Marvyn Abbey. He had bought the property in the preceding autumn, but the place had so fallen into decay through the disorders of time that more than six months elapsed ere it was inhabitable. The delay, however, fell out conveniently for Warrington; for the Bosanquets spent the winter abroad, and nothing must suit but he must spend it with them. There was never a man who pursued his passion with such ardou...

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The Mcwilliams Special

By: Frank H. Spearman

IT belongs to the Stories That Never Were Told, this of the McWilliams Special. But it happened years ago, and for that matter McWilliams is dead. It wasn't grief that killed him, either; though at one time his grief came uncommonly near killing us. It is an odd sort of a yarn, too; because one part of it never got to headquarters, and another part of it never got from headquarters. How, for instance, the mysterious car was ever started from Chicago on such a delirious s...

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The Maker of Moons

By: Robert W. Chambers

Excerpt: Concerning Yue?Laou and the Xin I know nothing more than you shall know. I am miserably anxious to clear the matter up. Perhaps what I write may save the United Stares Government money and lives, perhaps it may arouse the scientific world to action; at any rate it will put an end to the terrible suspense of two people. Certainty is better than suspense. If the Government dares to disregard this warning and refuses to send a thoroughly equipped expedition at once...

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A Millionaire of Yesterday

By: E. Phillips Oppenheim

Excerpt: ?Filth,? grunted Trent??ugh! I tell you what it is, my venerable friend?I have seen some dirty cabins in the west of Ireland and some vile holes in East London. I've been in some places which I can?t think of even now without feeling sick. I'm not a particular chap, wasn?t brought up to it?no, nor squeamish either, but this is a bit thicker than anything I've ever knocked up against. If Francis doesn't hurry we'll have to chuck it! We shall never stand it out, M...

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One More Murder

By: G.T. Fleming?Roberts

Excerpt: CHAPTER ONE. Not Quite Dead FROM across Martindale Street, Barney Ghent noticed that the door of the old Pomeroy house had opened. Somebody came down the short approach to the sidewalk. A woman. She turned north and ran, holding her purse up tight against her breast. She wasn?t Mrs. Taylor, Harry Pomeroy?s housekeeper. She was younger than Mrs. Taylor and her skirts were short. Barney hadn't seen anything of her face in the darkness. He didn?t know who she was, ...

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Letters of Cicero

By: Marcus Tullius Walter Miller

Excerpt: THE letters of Cicero are of a very varied character. They range from the most informal communications with members of his family to serious and elaborate compositions which are practically treatises in epistolary form. A very large proportion of them were obviously written out of the mood of the moment, with no thought of the possibility of publication; and in these the style is comparatively relaxed and colloquial. Others, addressed to public characters, are p...

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Saintgermain the Deathless

By: Andrew Lang, M.A.

Excerpt: Among the best brief masterpieces of fiction are Lytton?s The Haunters and the Haunted, and Thackeray?s Notch on the Axe in Roundabout Papers.* Both deal with a mysterious being who passes through the ages, rich, powerful, always behind the scenes, coming no man knows whence, and dying, or pretending to die, obscurely? you never find authentic evidence of his disease. In other later times, at other courts, such an one reappears and runs the same course of luxury...

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The Underground City

By: Jules Verne

Excerpt: Chapter 1. CONTRADICTORY LETTERS To Mr. F. R. Starr, Engineer, 30 Canongate, Edinburgh. IF Mr. James Starr will come to?morrow to the Aberfoyle coal?mines, Dochart pit, Yarrow shaft, a communication of an interesting nature will be made to him. ?Mr. James Starr will be awaited for, the whole day, at the Callander station, by Harry Ford, son of the old overman Simon Ford.? ?He is requested to keep this invitation secret.? Such was the letter which James Starr rec...

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The Chinese Nightingale and Other Poems

By: Vachel Lindsay

Excerpt: ?How, how,? he said. ?Friend Chang,? I said, ?San Francisco sleeps as the dead?Ended license, lust and play: Why do you iron the night away? Your big clock speaks with a deadly sound, With a tick and a wail till dawn comes round. While the monster shadows glower and creep, What can be better for man than sleep?? ?I will tell you a secret,? Chang replied; ?My breast with vision is satisfied, And I see green trees and fluttering wings, And my deathless bird from S...

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Norman Leslie : A Tale of the Present Times

By: Theodore S. Fay

On returning to New-York, after an absence of some years, I was agreeably surprised to find not a copy unsold of a large edition of this work. In presenting a second, I avail myself of the occasion to apologize for its defects, of which I am perfectly conscious. It was written with the unsettled mind of a traveller, in the stolen intervals of more imperative occupations; and circumstances, moreover, compelled me to part with it before it had received the time and care wh...

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Signs of Progress Among the Negroes

By: Booker T. Washington

Excerpt: IN addition to the problem of educating eight million negroes in our Southern States and ingrafting them into American citizenship, we now have the additional responsibility, either directly or indirectly, of educating and elevating about eight hundred thousand others of African descent in Cuba and Porto Rico, to say nothing of the white people of these islands, many of whom are in a condition about as deplorable as that of the negroes. We have, however, one adv...

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The Harlequinade

By: Dion Clayton Calthrop

Excerpt: Now in any excursion you get into all sorts of odd company, and fall into talk with persons out of your ordinary rule, and you borrow a match and get lent a magazine, and, as likely as not, you may hear the whole tragedy and comedy of a ham and beef carver?s life. So you will get a view of the world as oddly coloured as Harlequin?s clothes, with puffs of sentiment dear to the soul of Columbine, and Clownish fun with Pantaloonish wisdom and chuckles. When you wer...

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The Open Air

By: Richard Jefferies

Excerpt: SAINT GUIDO St. Guido ran out at the garden gate into a sandy lane, and down the lane till he came to a grassy bank. He caught hold of the bunches of grass and so pulled himself up. There was a footpath on the top which went straight in between fir?trees, and as he ran along they stood on each side of him like green walls.

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Sketches New and Old, Illustrated, Volume 3

By: Mark Twain

In San Francisco, the other day, A well-dressed boy, on his way to Sunday-school, was arrested and thrown into the city prison for stoning Chinamen. What a commentary is this upon human justice! What sad prominence it gives to our human disposition to tyrannize over the weak! San Francisco has little right to take credit to herself for her treatment of this poor boy. What had the child's education been? How should he suppose it was wrong to stone a Chinaman? Before we si...

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The Sending of Dana Da

By: Rudyard Kipling

Once upon a time some people in India made a new heaven and a new earth out of broken teacups, a missing brooch or two, and a hair brush. These were hidden under bushes, or stuffed into holes in the hillside, and an entire civil service of subordinate gods used to find or mend them again; and everyone said: There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in our philosophy. Several other things happened also, but the religion never seemed to get much beyond ...

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Plum Punch : Crime and the Courts

By: P.G. Wodehouse

Excerpt: ?There is,? observed the novelist gravely, ?a bad time coming for writers of fiction. A very bad time.? I replied that what with publishers reckoning thirteen copies as twelve, and editors regretting their so?called lack of space (sic), things were, for my humble needs, bad enough already. After which I asked for details. ?I have been reading a book,? said he, ?by a DR. GEORGE M GOULD. It is called Biographic Clinics, and it deals with the subject of the eyes, a...

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Mr. Humphries and His Inheritance

By: M. R. James

About fifteen years ago, on a date late in August or early in September, a train drew up at Wilsthorpe, a country station in Eastern England. Out of it stepped (with other passengers) a rather tall and reasonably good-looking young man, carrying a handbag and some papers tied up in a packet. He was expecting to be met, one would say, from the way in which he looked about him: and he was, as obviously, expected. The stationmaster ran forward a step or two, and then, seemi...

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A Wodehouse Miscellany

By: P.G. Wodehouse

Excerpt: ARTICLES SOME ASPECTS OF GAME?CAPTAINCY To the Game?Captain (of the football variety) the world is peopled by three classes, firstly the keen and regular player, next the partial slacker, thirdly, and lastly, the entire, abject and absolute slacker. Of the first class, the keen and regular player, little need be said. A keen player is a gem of purest rays serene, and when to his keenness he adds regularity and punctuality, life ceases to become the mere hollow b...

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The Sky Line of Spruce

By: Edison Marshall

Excerpt: THE convict gang had a pleasant place to work to?day. Their road building had taken them some miles from the scattered outskirts of Walla Walla, among fields green with growing barley. The air was fresh and sweet; the Western meadow larks, newly come, seemed in imminent danger of splitting their own throats through the exuberance of their song. Even the steel rails of the Northern Pacific, running parallel to the stretch of new road, gleamed pleasantly in the spring sun.

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Wayfarers

By: Algernon Henry Blackwood

Excerpt: I missed the train at Evian, and, after infinite trouble, discovered a motor that would take me, ice?axe and all, to Geneva. By hurrying, the connection might be just possible. I telegraphed to Haddon to meet me at the station, and lay back comfortably, dreaming of the precipices of Haute Savoie. We made good time; the roads were excellent, traffic of the slightest, when crash!

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