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Los Alamos Science No. 4, Winter/Spring 1982: Footnotes to A Progr...

By: Judith M. Lathrop

Description: This volume displays the extraordinary focus on basic research that has remained a LANL hallmark from the days of the Manhattan Projec?

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Los Alamos Science No. 11, Summer/Fall 1984: The March Toward High...

By: S. Peter Rosen

Description: During the second half of the 20th century, the field of elementary particle physics brought a major new understanding of the world at the smallest scales. That knowledge, summarized in the so-called Standard Model of particle physics, has remained valid for over 25 years. This volume is a tutorial by members of LANL's Theoretical Division that explains to scientists outside of the field the most important ideas of the Standard Model. It also includes specul...

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Los Alamos Science No. 30, 2006: Proton Radiography

By: Christopher Morris; John W. Hopson; Phillip Goldstone

Description: Stretching out along the mesa from west to east is the half-mile long linear accelerator, the heart of LANSCE. This high-intensity proton accelerator powers LANSCE's many experimental facilities including the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. In the last five years, LANSCE's contributions to national security have become increasingly important, including proton radiography movies of dynamic events, nuclear data ...

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Dateline : Los Alamos; August-September 1998: August-September 1998

By: Meredith Coonley, Editor

Description: Dateline Los Alamos was a publication of the Public Affairs Office, intended to place timely information about advances in science and technology in the hands of those agencies and organizations that fund our programs.

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Los Alamos Science No. 27, 2002: Ion-Trap Quantum Computation

By: Michael H. Holzscheiter

Description: A single atom or photon can exist in a superposition of two different states, just as a sound wave can be composed of different frequencies. At LANL's Quantum Institute, the wave-particle duality of individual quanta is being exploited to develop new information technologies including quantum cryptography, quantum computing, and quantum entanglement and teleportation. Research at the Quantum Institute also encompasses studies of Bose Einstein condensates, st...

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Los Alamos Science No. 26, 2000: Treatment of Liquid Wastes

By: Gordon D. Jarvinen, Geraldine M. Purdy, Barbara F. Smith, Thomas C. Robinson

Description: Plutonium is arguably the strangest element in the periodic table and the most difficult to handle in the laboratory. While its nuclear fission properties were correctly predicted well before it was first produced at the Berkeley cyclotron, its chemical and condensed matter properties still defy understanding, largely due to the anomalous behavior of the 5f electrons. Nevertheless, it plays a prominent role in nuclear weapons and nuclear energy production. F...

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Los Alamos Science No. 29, 2005: Predicting Risks in the Earth Sci...

By: Greg Valentine

Description: Improving predictive capability is an implicit goal in the major missions of Los Alamos National Laboratory: simulating performance of weapons in the stockpile, quantifying uncertainties in those simulations, and developing strategies to mitigate global threats. Success in achieving this goal depends on closely coordinating theory, experiment, and computer simulation.

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Dateline : Los Alamos; December 2000: December 2000

By: Meredith Coonley, Editor

Description: Dateline Los Alamos was a publication of the Public Affairs Office, intended to place timely information about advances in science and technology in the hands of those agencies and organizations that fund our programs.

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Los Alamos Science No. 13, Spring 1986: Cover and Table of Contents

By: Necia Grant Cooper

Description: LANL has long been a home to astrophysics research because the physical phenomena key to the performance of nuclear weapons-thermonuclear fusion, implosion and explosion, shock waves, hot plasmas, and materials under extreme temperatures and pressures- are also key to the dynamics of astronomical objects. This issue on astrophysics centers on the accretion of matter onto very dense stars and black holes and the interpretation of x-ray signals emitted during ...

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Los Alamos Science No. 17, 1989: The Future of Nuclear Weapons : T...

By: Paul C. White

Description: This volume, published prior to the end of the Cold War, reports on a national security conference aimed at predicting the future of nuclear weapons. While the participants did not predict the demise of the Soviet Union, they did foresee the more limited role for nuclear weapons in the US military posture, the increased emphasis on conventional warfare, and the rise of Japan and China. The increased reliance on conventional weapons predicted in this volume b...

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Los Alamos Science No. 16, 1988: Cover and Table of Contents

By: Necia Grant Cooper

Description: In a conference sponsored by the Laboratory Fellows on the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life: George Wald, Nobel Laureate in physiology, spoke about the nature of consciousness; David Hubel, also a Nobel Laureate in physiology, discussed his work on the neural circuits responsible for the perception of form, movement, and color; paleontologist Jack Sepkoski talked of periodic extinctions on Earth and their role in the evolution of new life forms; a...

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Los Alamos Science No. 9, Fall 1983: Gene Expression

By: Carle E. Hildebrand, Brian D. Crawford, Ronald A. Walters, and M. Duane Enger in Collaboration with Roger Eckhardt

Description: This volume illustrates a growing ability to understand complex biological systems and the role of computers in increasing that capability.

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Los Alamos Science No. 21, 1993: AGEX II : The High-Energy-Density...

By: Stephen M. Younger

Description: In 1993, LANL's 50th anniversary, the Cold War was over, and the Laboratory was in the midst of changing its identity. This volume captures the mood of the times through a candid roundtable among LANL scientists and former Director Harold Agnew. Hans Bethe and Edward Teller offer separate visions of the Laboratory's future, and feature stories examine the new ""stewardship"" of the nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing, the threat of nu...

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Los Alamos Science No. 30, 2006: Storing Hydrogen in Crystalline M...

By: Konstantin A. Lokshin, Yusheng Zhao

Description: Stretching out along the mesa from west to east is the half-mile long linear accelerator, the heart of LANSCE. This high-intensity proton accelerator powers LANSCE's many experimental facilities including the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. In the last five years, LANSCE's contributions to national security have become increasingly important, including proton radiography movies of dynamic events, nuclear data ...

Read More
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Los Alamos Science No. 11, Summer/Fall 1984: The Family Problem

By: T. Goldman Michael, Martin Nieto

Description: During the second half of the 20th century, the field of elementary particle physics brought a major new understanding of the world at the smallest scales. That knowledge, summarized in the so-called Standard Model of particle physics, has remained valid for over 25 years. This volume is a tutorial by members of LANL's Theoretical Division that explains to scientists outside of the field the most important ideas of the Standard Model. It also includes specul...

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Los Alamos Science No. 28, 2003: Shock Compression Techniques for ...

By: Robert S. Hixson, George T. Gray, Dennis B. Hayes

Description: This 60th anniversary review of LANL features the Laboratory's three overarching thrusts: nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship--a decade-long effort to develop the scientific base to certify the US stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing; threat reduction--a historic mission that includes assuring nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, reducing the threat of biological and chemical attacks, and insuring homeland security; and finally, strategic investment...

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Los Alamos Science No. 20, 1992: Maps, Markers, and the Five-Year ...

By: Bob Moyzis, David Cox, Maynard Olson, Nancy Wexler and David Galas

Description: The human genome, the DNA content in each of our cells, presents us with a vast frontier containing answers to many questions about how we evolved, how we are related to other living things, and how we differ from one another. The Human Genome Project is opening up that territory to our understanding. LANL scientists were instrumental in getting the DOE involved in this project and in this volume present an introduction to the tools of genetics and molecular...

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Los Alamos Science No. 6, Fall 1982: The On and Off of Human Allergies

By: Byron Goldstein, Micah Dembo

Description: Hans Bethe's memo, republished here, was aimed at refuting the notion the J. Robert Oppenheimer had delayed the development of thermonuclear weapons. Other articles focus on topics in nonlinear science and bioscience

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Los Alamos Science No. 28, 2003: How Archival Test Data Contribute...

By: Fred N. Mortensen; John M. Scott; Stirling A. Colgate

Description: This 60th anniversary review of LANL features the Laboratory's three overarching thrusts: nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship--a decade-long effort to develop the scientific base to certify the US stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing; threat reduction--a historic mission that includes assuring nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, reducing the threat of biological and chemical attacks, and insuring homeland security; and finally, strategic investment...

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Los Alamos Science No. 26, 2000: Computational Studies of Actinide...

By: P. Jeffrey Hay, Richard L. Martin

Description: Plutonium is arguably the strangest element in the periodic table and the most difficult to handle in the laboratory. While its nuclear fission properties were correctly predicted well before it was first produced at the Berkeley cyclotron, its chemical and condensed matter properties still defy understanding, largely due to the anomalous behavior of the 5f electrons. Nevertheless, it plays a prominent role in nuclear weapons and nuclear energy production. F...

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