World Library  


 
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 14, Fall 1986: Metropolis, Monte Carlo, and...

By: Herbert L. Anderson

Description: Natural heat engines were the passion of the late John Wheatley, one of the greatest low-temperature physicists of the 20th century. Natural engines have no moving parts, making them ideal for applications in space. John Wheatley loved them because they could be fully understood using classical thermodynamics. In a roundtable, his colleagues bring to life Wheatley's unique style of work and dedication. Other topics in this volume include the application of p...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 20, 1992: Members of the Human Genome Cente...

By: Necia Grant Cooper

Description: The human genome, the DNA content in each of our cells, presents us with a vast frontier containing answers to many questions about how we evolved, how we are related to other living things, and how we differ from one another. The Human Genome Project is opening up that territory to our understanding. LANL scientists were instrumental in getting the DOE involved in this project and in this volume present an introduction to the tools of genetics and molecular...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 14, Fall 1986: The Natural Heat Engine

By: John C. Wheatley, Gregory W. Swift, Albert Migliori

Description: Natural heat engines were the passion of the late John Wheatley, one of the greatest low-temperature physicists of the 20th century. Natural engines have no moving parts, making them ideal for applications in space. John Wheatley loved them because they could be fully understood using classical thermodynamics. In a roundtable, his colleagues bring to life Wheatley's unique style of work and dedication. Other topics in this volume include the application of p...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Dateline : Los Alamos; May 1998: May 1998

By: Meredith Coonley, Editor

Description: Dateline Los Alamos was a publication of the Public Affairs Office, intended to place timely information about advances in science and technology in the hands of those agencies and organizations that fund our programs.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 26, 2000: A Single-Crystal Saga

By: Roger L. Moment

Description: Plutonium is arguably the strangest element in the periodic table and the most difficult to handle in the laboratory. While its nuclear fission properties were correctly predicted well before it was first produced at the Berkeley cyclotron, its chemical and condensed matter properties still defy understanding, largely due to the anomalous behavior of the 5f electrons. Nevertheless, it plays a prominent role in nuclear weapons and nuclear energy production. F...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 29, 2005: Back Cover 

By: Necia Grant Cooper

Description: Improving predictive capability is an implicit goal in the major missions of Los Alamos National Laboratory: simulating performance of weapons in the stockpile, quantifying uncertainties in those simulations, and developing strategies to mitigate global threats. Success in achieving this goal depends on closely coordinating theory, experiment, and computer simulation.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 21, 1993: John Malone and the Invention of ...

By: John Malone

Description: In 1993, LANL's 50th anniversary, the Cold War was over, and the Laboratory was in the midst of changing its identity. This volume captures the mood of the times through a candid roundtable among LANL scientists and former Director Harold Agnew. Hans Bethe and Edward Teller offer separate visions of the Laboratory's future, and feature stories examine the new ""stewardship"" of the nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing, the threat of nu...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 28, 2003: High-Resolution Methods for Hydro...

By: William J. Rider

Description: This 60th anniversary review of LANL features the Laboratory's three overarching thrusts: nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship--a decade-long effort to develop the scientific base to certify the US stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing; threat reduction--a historic mission that includes assuring nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, reducing the threat of biological and chemical attacks, and insuring homeland security; and finally, strategic investment...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 15, 1987: Sequence Analysis : Contributions...

By: Walter B. Goad

Description: Stan Ulam, brilliant mathematician, participant in the Manhattan Project, and co-inventor of the hydrogen bomb, was one of those extraordinary men who solidified LANL's early reputation. Stan left a legacy in mathematics, physics, and biology, reflecting his immense intelligence and gift for abstraction. He was a catalyst for new programs at LANL and offered novel ideas even to fields he knew little about. In this volume, mathematicians and physicists who we...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 26, 2000: Mechanical Behavior of Plutonium ...

By: Siegfried S. Hecker, Michael F. Stevens

Description: Plutonium is arguably the strangest element in the periodic table and the most difficult to handle in the laboratory. While its nuclear fission properties were correctly predicted well before it was first produced at the Berkeley cyclotron, its chemical and condensed matter properties still defy understanding, largely due to the anomalous behavior of the 5f electrons. Nevertheless, it plays a prominent role in nuclear weapons and nuclear energy production. F...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 21, 1993: Malone Refrigeration : An Old Sol...

By: Gregory W. Swift

Description: In 1993, LANL's 50th anniversary, the Cold War was over, and the Laboratory was in the midst of changing its identity. This volume captures the mood of the times through a candid roundtable among LANL scientists and former Director Harold Agnew. Hans Bethe and Edward Teller offer separate visions of the Laboratory's future, and feature stories examine the new ""stewardship"" of the nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing, the threat of nu...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 24, 1996: The Dirac Series : A New Internat...

By: Necia Grant Cooper

Description: Since the end of the Cold War, Russian and American nuclear weapons scientists have been collaborating on both peaceful science projects and the sensitive problem of nuclear materials control. This volume tells the story of that collaboration, tracing its roots to pulsed-power experiments in the 1960s and the joint Russian-American nuclear tests of 1988 to verify compliance with the Threshold Test Ban Treaty. An outgrowth of this scientific collaboration was...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 30, 2006: Electric Dipole Moment of the Neu...

By: Martin D. Cooper

Description: Stretching out along the mesa from west to east is the half-mile long linear accelerator, the heart of LANSCE. This high-intensity proton accelerator powers LANSCE's many experimental facilities including the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. In the last five years, LANSCE's contributions to national security have become increasingly important, including proton radiography movies of dynamic events, nuclear data ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 7, Winter/Spring 1983: The Reactor Safety P...

By: Kaye D. Lathrop

Description: In 1983 many of the pioneers who helped develop the first fission and thermonuclear bombs were still at LANL and able to relay their first-hand experiences. This volume is filled with their stories and insights into the scientific and technological developments that grew from the nuclear weapons work.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 26, 2000: The Chemical Complexities of Plut...

By: David L. Clark

Description: Plutonium is arguably the strangest element in the periodic table and the most difficult to handle in the laboratory. While its nuclear fission properties were correctly predicted well before it was first produced at the Berkeley cyclotron, its chemical and condensed matter properties still defy understanding, largely due to the anomalous behavior of the 5f electrons. Nevertheless, it plays a prominent role in nuclear weapons and nuclear energy production. F...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Dateline : Los Alamos; April 1999: April 1999

By: Meredith Coonley, Editor

Description: Dateline Los Alamos was a publication of the Public Affairs Office, intended to place timely information about advances in science and technology in the hands of those agencies and organizations that fund our programs.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 8, Summer 1983: Cover and Table of Contents

By: Necia Grant Cooper

Description: The evolution of nuclear and radiochemistry at Los Alamos is a story that reflects the growth and development of the Laboratory itself. The essential role of nuclear chemistry in diagnosing the performance of nuclear weapons during both aboveground and underground tests led to a rich program in basic and applied research in medicine, geochemistry, atmospheric studies, and the migration and containment of nuclear wastes. This volume also discusses the use of ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 5, Summer 1982: The War of Time Against The...

By: Judith M. Lathrop

Description: The three exciting research projects presented here are shown to have surprising roots in weapons-related research and development.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 2, Winter/Spring 1981: High Explosives: The...

By: William C. Davis

Description: This volume displays the extraordinary focus on basic research that has remained a LANL hallmark from the days of the Manhattan project. Airborne experiments on the solar corona, the science of high explosives, the boundary layer problem in fluid flow, & more...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Los Alamos Science No. 3, Summer/Fall 1981: Breeder Reactor Safety...

By: Charles R. Bell

Description: This volume, produced shortly after the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor, presents a detailed analysis of the accident by Los Alamos researchers as well as discussions of reactor safety for both traditional light water reactors as well as fast breeder reactors. LANL expertise in reactor-safety analysis and multiphase fluid-flow simulation is amply demonstrated through tutorial-like presentations.

Read More
 
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 1 - 20 of 45 - Pages: 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.