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Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus

By: Polycrates, Bishop of Ephesus

[A.D. 130-196.] This author [3] comes in as an appendix to the stories of Polycarp and Irenaeus and good Anicetus, and his writings also bear upon the contrast presented by the less creditable history of Victor. If, as I suppose, the appearance of our Lord to St. John on the Lord's day was on the Paschal Sunday, it may at first seem surprising that this Apostle can be claimed by Polycrates in behalf of the Eastern custom to keep Easter, with the Jews, on the fourteenth d...

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The Taking of Stingaree

By: E.W. Hornung

Excerpt: STINGAREE had crossed the Murray, and all Victoria was agog with the news. It was not his first descent upon that Colony, nor likely to be his last, unless Sub?Inspector Kilbride and his mounted myrmidons did much better than they had done before. There is no stimulus, however, like a trembling reputation. Within four?and?twenty hours Kilbride himself was on the track of the invader, whose heels he had never seen, much less his face. And he rode alone.

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The End of the Dream

By: John G. Neihardt

A MAN who has the deeper sense of God finds nothing unimportant; he who imputes insignificance to the most inconspicuous of objects or aspirations, not only belittles his God, but clearly defines the capacity of his being. It is merely subjective egotism that gives size to the object. Does not the small boy's careless step upon an ant hill mark an epoch in insect history? God is no trifler. There is as much of the epic in the unlyred and futile toil of the tumble bug as ...

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The Planet Mars Its Inhabitants

By: Eros Urides

Foreword: It was Eros Urides, the real Martian behind the scenes, who dictated the contents of this book through the medium to Mr. Kennon. It was further stated that ?The medium was held in trance for short periods only, as the medium must necessarily experience the atmosphere of Mars which is more rarified than that of your Earth.? Writes also that the medium seemed to have some difficulty, and at first pain in breathing while in the trance condition. Mr. Kennon also wr...

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A Path to Freedom

By: Yogi Sharanananda

My father's ancestors were the Shaws of Rothiemurchus, in Scotland, and the ruins of their castle may still be seen on the island of Loch-an-Eilan, in the northern Highlands. It was never the picturesque castle of song and story, this home of the fighting Shaws, but an austere fortress, probably built in Roman times; and even to-day the crumbling walls which alone are left of it show traces of the relentless assaults upon them. Of these the last and the most successful w...

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Personal Recollections

By: Elizabeth?Charlotte, Duchesse d'Orleans

Excerpt: LETTER I. CHILDHOOD. I have given my best consideration to the arguments by which you support the demand for a few notices of events connected with my personal recollections of the past. That which has chiefly influenced me is the consideration, urged on what I know to be just and reasonable grounds, that when it has pleased God to bring any one before the public in the capacity of an author, that person becomes in some sense public property; having abandoned th...

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Eight Cousins

By: Louisa May Alcott; 1832-1888

Rose sat all alone in the big best parlor, with her little handkerchief laid ready to catch the first tear, for she was thinking of her troubles, and a shower was expected. She had retired to this room as a good place in which to be miserable; for it was dark and still, full of ancient furniture, sombre curtains, and hung all around with portraits of solemn old gentlemen in wigs, severe-nosed ladies in top-heavy caps, and staring children in little bob-tailed coats or sh...

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Imitation of Anacreon and Other

By: Jean de la Fontaine

AXIOCHUS, a handsome youth of old, And Alcibiades, (both gay and bold,) So well agreed, they kept a beauteous belle, With whom by turns they equally would dwell. IT happened, one of them so nicely played, The fav'rite lass produced a little maid, Which both extolled, and each his own believed, Though doubtless one or t'other was deceived. BUT when to riper years the bantling grew, And sought her mother's foot-steps to pursue, Each friend desired to be her chosen swain, A...

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The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 1

By: Alexander Pope

Excerpt: LIFE OF ALEXANDER POPE Alexander Pope was born in Lombard Street, London, on the 21st of May 1688?the year of the Revolution. His father was a linen?merchant, in thriving circumstances, and said to have noble blood in his veins. His mother was Edith or Editha Turner, daughter of William Turner, Esq., of York. Mr Carruthers, in his excellent Life of the Poet, mentions that there was an Alexander Pope, a clergyman, in the remote parish of Reay, in Caithness, who r...

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Mr. Ledbetter's Vacation

By: Herbert George Wells

Excerpt: My friend, Mr. Ledbetter, is a round?faced little man, whose natural mildness of eye is gigantically exaggerated when you catch the beam through his glasses, and whose deep, deliberate voice irritates irritable people.

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Importation of Foreign Corn

By: Thomas Malthus

The professed object of the Observations on the Corn Laws, which I published in the spring of 1814, was to state with the strictest impartiality the advantages and disadvantages which, in the actual circumstances of our present situation, were likely to attend the measures under consideration, respecting the trade in corn. A fair review of both sides of the question, without any attempt to conceal the peculiar evils, whether temporary or permanent, which might belong to ...

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Criminals, Idiots, Women and Minors

By: Frances Power Cobbe

Excerpt: THERE was an allegory rather popular about thirty years ago, whose manifest purpose was to impress on the juvenile mind that tendency which Mr. Matthew Arnold has ingeniously designated ?Hebraism.? The hero of the tale descends upon earth from some distant planet, and is conducted by a mundane cicerone through one of our great cities, where he beholds the docks and arsenals, the streets and marts, the galleries of art, and the palaces of royalty. The visitor adm...

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The Lure of the Labrador Wild

By: Dillon Wallace

Preface: Three years have passed since Hubbard and I began that fateful journey into Labrador of which this volume is a record. A little more than a year has elapsed since the first edition of our record made its appearance from the press. Meanwhile I have looked behind the ranges. Grand Lake has again borne me upon the bosom of her broad, deep waters into the great lonely wilderness that lured Hubbard to his death.

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Poems on Various Subjects

By: Anne Macvicar Grant

Grief's sharpest thorn hard pressing on my breast, I strive with wakeful melody to cheer The sullen gloom, sweet Philomel, like thee. YOUNG. GO, artless records of a life obscure, Memorials dear of loves and friendships past, Of blameless minds from strife and envy pure; Go, scatter'd by Affliction's bitter blast...

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The Grinding Organ

By: Maria Edgeworth

PREFACE: This compilation of Dramas for the drawing-room, which I have made at the request of the publishers, contains some pieces of acknowledged merit, that have been pushed aside by new works of the kind, but which are still dear to the memory of parents, though they are almost unknown to their children. They are, I think, better than those that have taken their place. Mrs. Jameson's Much Coin, Much Care, Miss Edgeworth's Old Poz and Dumb Andy, Miss Aikin's Alfred, ar...

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A Doctor of the Old School

By: Ian Mclaren

Preface: It is with great good will that I write this short preface to the edition of ?A Doctor of the Old School? (which has been illustrated by Mr. Gordon after an admirable and understanding fashion) because there are two things that I should like to say to my readers, being also my friends. One, is to answer a question that has been often and fairly asked. Was there ever any doctor so self?forgetful and so utterly Christian as William MacLure? To which I am proud to ...

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The Adventures of Reddy Fox

By: Thornton W. Burgess

Reddy Fox lived with Granny Fox. You see, Reddy was one of a large family, so large that Mother Fox had hard work to feed so many hungry little mouths and so she had let Reddy go to live with old Granny Fox. Granny Fox was the wisest, slyest, smartest fox in all the country round, and now that Reddy had grown so big, she thought it about time that he began to learn the things that every fox should know. So every day she took him hunting with her and taught him all the th...

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Notes by the Way in a Sailor's Life

By: Arthur E. Knights

Introduction: In 1898 I was in Hongkong on a business affair which gave me much leisure, when Murray Bain, editor of the China Mail, whom I had long known, asked why I did not send him a letter occasionally. This led to my venturing to give him Some Notes by the Way in A Sailor's Life. These Notes, I considered, could only be of interest locally. But some of my friends have urged me to overcome my diffidence and put them in pamphlet form, which I now do for distribution ...

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The Pothunters

By: P.G. Wodehouse

Excerpt: [1]. PATIENT PERSEVERANCE PRODUCES PUGILISTIC PRODIGIES. ?Where have I seen that face before?? said a voice. Tony Graham looked up from his bag. ?Hullo, Allen,? he said, ?what the dickens are you up here for?? ?I was rather thinking of doing a little boxing. If you?ve no objection, of course.? ?But you ought to be on a bed of sickness, and that sort of thing. I heard you?d crocked yourself.? ?so I did. Nothing much, though. Trod on myself during a game of fives,...

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The Settler and the Savage

By: R.M. Ballantyne

Excerpt: A solitary horseman?a youth in early manhood?riding at a snail?s pace over the great plains, or karroo, of South Africa. His chin on his breast; his hands in the pockets of an old shooting?coat; his legs in ragged trousers, and his feet in worn?out boots. Regardless of stirrups, the last are dangling. The reins hang on the neck of his steed, whose head may be said to dangle from its shoulders, so nearly does its nose approach the ground. A felt hat covers the yo...

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