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Enzymes in Agricultural Sciences

By: Liliana Gianfreda; Maria A Rao

In agricultural soils the presence of enzymes assures a correct, integrated and regulated course of processes at soil-plant-environment interfaces that lead to the growth and production of crops for human and animal feed. The knowledge of their main properties and functions is a need for all scientists involved in this research field....

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Tuberculosis in the Era of Globalization

By: Khalid Al-Anzai

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) complex, which include: M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. bovis BCG, M. africanum, M. microti, M. canetti, M. pinipedii, M. caprae and M. mungi [1]. Other Tuberculosise that may infect humans include: M. leprae, M. avium, M. intracellulare and M. scrofulaceum. M. tuberculosis is an aerobic, non-spore-forming, non-motile bacillus. It belongs to the family Tuberculosisceae [2]. M. tuberculosis is pathogenic for humans while M. bovis is usually pathogenic for animals. Once infected, active disease develops in about 10% of cases, usually within 1 - 2 years after exposure. The remaining individuals enter into a state of latency which can reactivate at a later stage particularly if the individual becomes immunocompromised [3]. Active TB is predominantly pulmonary in nature and develops in 59% of cases, while extrapulmonary TB occurs in the rest. Latent TB infection has no clinical manifestations and is not contagious, but can reactivate at a later stage, particularly if the immunity of the host decreases significantly [3,4]. Immunocompromised patients ...

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Work with Plants

By: Vladimir Antonov; T. Danilevich, translator

Plants also are living beings, which are even capable of reacting emotionally! Plants, as we are, are physical bodies with incarnate units of life in them; they are evolving souls going through the vegetal level of development. It is in this way that we have to regard plants if we want to learn love!...

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Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not

By: Ms. Pere Millán, Editor; Florence Nightingale

In her introduction to the 1974 edition, Joan Quixley, then head of the Nightingale School of Nursing, wrote that despite the passage of time since Notes on Nursing was published, "the book astonishes one with its relevance to modern attitudes and skills in nursing, whether this be practised at home by the 'ordinary woman', in hospital or in the community. The social, economic and professional differences of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in no way hinder the young student or pupil from developing, if he or she is motivated to do so, its unchanged fundamentals by way of intelligent thought and practice". "With its mid-nineteenth century background of poverty, neglect, ignorance and prejudice the book was a challenge to contemporary views of nursing, of nurses and of the patient". "The book was the first of its kind ever to be written. It appeared at a time when the simple rules of health were only beginning to be known, when its topics were of vital importance not only for the well-being and recovery of patients, when hospitals were riddled with infection, when nurses were still mainly regarded as ignorant, uneducated person...

The book included advice and practices for the following areas: ventilation and warming health in houses petty management (how things are done by others when you must be away) noise variety (environment) taking food and what kinds of food bed and bedding light cleanliness of rooms personal cleanliness chattering hopes and advices (the false assurances and recommendations of family and friends to the sick) observation of the sick ...

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Piccadilly Jim

By: P. G. Wodehouse

Excerpt: Chapter 1. A RED?HAIRED GIRL The residence of Mr. Peter Pett, the well?known financier, on Riverside Drive is one of the leading eyesores of that breezy and expensive boulevard. As you pass by in your limousine, or while enjoying ten cents worth of fresh air on top of a green omnibus, it jumps out and bites at you. Architects, confronted with it, reel and throw up their hands defensively, and even the lay observer has a sense of shock. The place resembles in almost equal proportions a cathedral, a suburban villa, a hotel and a Chinese pagoda. Many of its windows are of stained glass, and above the porch stand two terra?cotta lions, considerably more repulsive even than the complacent animals which guard New York?s Public Library. It is a house which is impossible to overlook: and it was probably for this reason that Mrs. Pett insisted on her husband buying it, for she was a woman who liked to be noticed....

Table of Contents: Piccadilly Jim, 1 -- P.G. Wodehouse, 1

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New Collected Rhymes

By: Andrew Lang

PREFACE: This poor little flutter of rhymes would not have been let down the wind: the project would have been abandoned but for the too flattering encouragement of a responsible friend. I trust that he may not live to rue the day, like Keith of Craigentolly in the ballad. The Loyal Lyrics on Charles and James and the White Rose must not be understood as implying a rebellious desire for the subversion of the present illustrious dynasty....

· PREFACE · IN AUGUSTINUM DOBSON—JAM RUDE DONATUM · HOW THE MAID MARCHED FROM BLOIS · LONE PLACES OF THE DEER · AN OLD SONG—1750 · JACOBITE AULD LANG SYNE.—LOCHIEL'S REGIMENT, 1747 · THE PRINCE'S BIRTHDAY—ROME, 31ST DECEMBER, 1721 · THE TENTH OF JUNE, 1715 · WHITE ROSE DAY—JUNE 10, 1688 · RED AND WHITE ROSES · THE BONNIE BANKS O' LOCH LOMOND—1746 · KENMURE—1715 · CULLODEN · THE LAST OF THE LEAL—DECEMBER 31, 1787 · JEANNE d'ARC · TO HELEN · BALLADE OF DEAD CRICKETERS · BRAHMA—AFTER EMERSON · GAINSBOROUGH GHOSTS—IN THE GROSVENOR GALLERY · A REMONSTRANCE WITH THE FAIR · RHYME OF RHYMES · RHYME OF OXFORD COCKNEY RHYMES—(EXHIBITED IN THE OXFORD MAGAZINE) · ROCOCO · THE FOOD OF FICTION · A HIGHLY VALUABLE CHAIN OF THOUGHTS · MATRIMONY · PISCATORI PISCATOR—IN MEMORY OF THOMAS TOD STODDART · THE CONTENTED ANGLER · OFF MY GAME · THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN WHO HAS GIVEN UP COLLECTING · THE BALLADE OF THE SUBCONSCIOUS SELF · BALLADE OF THE OPTIMIST · ZIMBABWE · LOVE'S CRYPTOGRAM · TUSITALA...

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The Maine Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

Excerpt: ON THE 31st of August, 1846, I left Concord in Massachusetts for Bangor and the backwoods of Maine, by way of the railroad and steamboat, intending to accompany a relative of mine engaged in the lumber-trade in Bangor, as far as a dam on the west branch of the Penobscot, in which property he was interested. From this place, which is about one hundred miles by the river above Bangor, thirty miles from the Houlton military road, and five miles beyond the last log-hut, I proposed to make excursions to Mount Ktaadn, the second highest mountain in New England, about thirty miles distant, and to some of the lakes of the Penobscot, either alone or with such company as I might pick up there. It is unusual to find a camp so far in the woods at that season, when lumbering operations have ceased, and I was glad to avail myself of the circumstance of a gang of men being employed there at that time in repairing the injuries caused by the great freshet in the spring. The mountain may be approached more easily and directly on horseback and on foot from the northeast side, by the Aroostook road, and the Wassataquoik River; but in that case...

Table of Contents: Ktaadn, 1 -- Chesuncook, 51 -- The Allegash and East Branch, 96 -- Appendix, 184 -- I. TREES., 184 -- II. FLOWERS AND SHRUBS., 185 -- III. LIST OF PLANTS., 188 -- IV. LIST OF BIRDS, 196 -- V. QUADRUPEDS., 197 -- VI. OUTFIT FOR AN EXCURSION., 198 -- VII. A LIST OF INDIAN WORDS., 199...

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Following the Equator, Illustrated, Vol. 3

By: Mark Twain

Mr. G. called. I had not seen him since Nauheim, Germany—several years ago; the time that the cholera broke out at Hamburg. We talked of the people we had known there, or had casually met; and G. said: Do you remember my introducing you to an earl—the Earl of C.? Yes. That was the last time I saw you. You and he were in a carriage, just starting—belated—for the train. I remember it. I remember it too, because of a thing which happened then which I was not looking for. He had told me a while before, about a remarkable and interesting Californian whom he had met and who was a friend of yours, and said that if he should ever meet you he would ask you for some particulars about that Californian. The subject was not mentioned that day at Nauheim, for we were hurrying away, and there was no time; but the thing that surprised me was this: when I induced you, you said, 'I am glad to meet your lordship gain.' The I again' was the surprise. He is a little hard of hearing, and didn't catch that word, and I thought you hadn't intended that he should. As we drove off I had only time to say, 'Why, what do you know about him?' and I understood you...

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3. CHAPTER XX. A Caller—A Talk about Old Times—The Fox Hunt—An Accurate Judgment of an Idiot—How We Passed the Custom Officers in Italy CHAPTER XXI. The Weet-Weet—Keeping down the Population—Victoria—Killing the Aboriginals—Pioneer Days in Queensland— Material for a Drama—The Bush— Pudding with Arsenic Revenge—A Right Spirit but a Wrong Method—Death of Donga Billy CHAPTER XXII. Continued Description of Aboriginals—Manly Qualities—Dodging Balls— Feats of Spring—Jumping—Where the Kangaroo Learned its Art 'Well Digging—Endurance—Surgery—Artistic Abilities—Fennimore Cooper's Last Chance—Australian Slang CHAPTER XXIII. To Horsham (Colony of Victoria)—Description of Horsham—At the Hotel— Pepper Tree-The Agricultural College, Forty Pupils—High Temperature— Width of Road in Chains, Perches, etc.—The Bird with a Forgettable Name- -The Magpie and the Lady—Fruit Trees—Soils—Sheep Shearing—To Stawell —Gold Mining Country—$75,000 per Month Income and able to Keep House— Fine Grapes and Wine—The Dryest Community on Earth—The Three Sisters— Gum Trees and Water CHAPTER XXIV. Road to Ballarat—The City—Great Gold Strike, 1851—Rush ...

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The Story of Evolution

By: Joseph Mccabe

An ingenious student of science once entertained his generation with a theory of how one might behold again all the stirring chapters that make up the story of the earth. The living scene of our time is lit by the light of the sun, and for every few rays that enter the human eye, and convey the image of it to the human mind, great floods of the reflected light pour out, swiftly and indefinitely, into space. Imagine, then, a man moving out into space more rapidly than light, his face turned toward the earth. Flashing through the void at, let us say, a million miles a second, he would (if we can overlook the dispersion of the rays of light) overtake in succession the light that fell on the French Revolution, the Reformation, the Norman Conquest, and the faces of the ancient empires. He would read, in reverse order, the living history of man and whatever lay before the coming of man....

· PREFACE · CHAPTER I. THE DISCOVERY OF THE UNIVERSE · CHAPTER II. THE FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNIVERSE · CHAPTER III. THE BIRTH AND DEATH OF WORLDS · CHAPTER IV. THE PREPARATION OF THE EARTH · CHAPTER V. THE BEGINNING OF LIFE · CHAPTER VI. THE INFANCY OF THE EARTH · CHAPTER VII. THE PASSAGE TO THE LAND · CHAPTER VIII. THE COAL-FOREST · CHAPTER IX. THE ANIMALS OF THE COAL-FOREST · CHAPTER X. THE PERMIAN REVOLUTION · CHAPTER XI. THE MIDDLE AGES OF THE EARTH · CHAPTER XII. THE AGE OF REPTILES · CHAPTER XIII. THE BIRD AND THE MAMMAL · CHAPTER XIV. IN THE DAYS OF THE CHALK · CHAPTER XV. THE TERTIARY ERA · CHAPTER XVI. THE FLOWER AND THE INSECT · CHAPTER XVII. THE ORIGIN OF OUR MAMMALS · CHAPTER XVIII. THE EVOLUTION OF MAN · CHAPTER XIX. MAN AND THE GREAT ICE-AGE · CHAPTER XX. THE DAWN OF CIVILISATION · CHAPTER XXI. EVOLUTION IN HISTORY...

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The Harness Makers' Guide : Containing the Lengths for Cutting and Making Harnesses, Bridle Work, Straps, Shewing the Cost of Manufacture

By: Office of Saddlery and Harness

Veterinary Library's copy part of the John A. Seaverns Equine Collection

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The Home Dietitian ; Or, Food and Health; Scientific Dietetics Practically Applied

By: Comstock, Belle Jessie Wood, 1880-1961
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Hog Cholera and Serum Treatment

By: Tennessee. Department of Agriculture
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Horseshoeing

By: Adams, John William, B. 1862

Veterinary Library's copy part of the John A. Seaverns Equine Collection

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Handbuch der Anatomie der Wirbelthiere

By: Thomas Henry Huxley

Google Books Digitalization Project

English edition has title: Manual of the anatomy of vertebrated animals.

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Horses Past and Present

By: Gilbey, Walter, Sir 1st Bart., 1831-1914
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The Horse Book : A Practical Treatise on the American Horse Breeding Industry as Allied to the Farm

By: Johnstone, James Hope Stewart, 1861
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The Household Physician : A Family Guide to the Preservation of Health and to the Domestic Treatment of Ailments and Disease, With Chapters on Food and Drugs, And First Aid in Accidents and Injuries

By: M'Gregor Robertson, J., Joseph, 1858-1925, Mckendrick, John Gray, 1841-1926
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Prevention and Response to Intentional Contamination

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

Background: While intentional contamination remains rare, this risk, including bio-terrorism threats, may have local, regional, or global impact and should be given serious consideration by food safety authorities and the food industry. Although the Food and Drug Administration within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS/FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) have always been vigilant in safeguarding the United States food supply, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, brought a heightened awareness to the vulnerability of the food supply to intentional contamination. The U.S. has expanded its activities and capabilities by taking additional measures to enhance the security of products under its regulatory umbrella....

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De la Maniere Dont les Services de Tutelle Encouragent et Controlent Lapplication des Haccp par les Producteurs et les Negociants

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: Rappel En vertu de la r?glementation f?d?rale en vigueur aux Etats-Unis, les fruits de mer (d?cembre 1995), les viandes et la chair de volaille (juillet 1996) et les jus (janvier 2001) vendus aux Etats-Unis doivent ?tre conditionn?s dans le respect du syst?me HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point ou points de contr?le critiques pour l?analyse des risques). Puisqu?il s?agissait d?un changement marqu? dans la r?glementation de ces aliments par l?Etat, le processus d??laboration des r?glements dans chaque cas est all? au-del? de l?obligation d?avis ?crit et de commentaires pour inclure des r?unions et des discussions publiques dans bien des domaines, notamment celui des modalit?s d?application. Avant de publier chacun des r?glements, les services de tutelle ont mis au point un programme de vulgarisation exhaustif ainsi que des mat?riels explicatifs, comme des directives pour l?identification et la ma?trise des p?rils, des normes de l?talit? et de stabilisation de performance ainsi que des plans HACCP mod?le concernant des proc?d?s et des produits courant. Les services f?d?raux comp?tents ? le Food Safety and Inspection...

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Inauguration of the International Food Safety Authorities Network (Infosan

By: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Nutrition Reference Publication

Excerpt: 1. On 13 October 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO) will announce the inauguration of the new International Food Safety Authorities Network (INFOSAN), which has been developed in cooperation with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), to promote the exchange of food safety information and to improve collaboration among food safety authorities at national and international levels. This introductory paper provides an overview of INFOSAN and its emergency component, INFOSAN EMERGENCY ......

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