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World Health Organization Note for the Press, Year 2005, No. 8: Animal to Human Transplantation - Future Potential, Present Risks

By World Health Organization

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Book Id: WPLBN0000053774
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.2 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005
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Title: World Health Organization Note for the Press, Year 2005, No. 8: Animal to Human Transplantation - Future Potential, Present Risks  
Author: World Health Organization
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Health., Public health, Wellness programs
Collections: Medical Library Collection, World Health Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: World Health Organization

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Organization, W. H. (n.d.). World Health Organization Note for the Press, Year 2005, No. 8. Retrieved from http://hawaiilibrary.net/


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Medical Reference Publication

Excerpt
Geneva - Transplantation of animal organs, living cells and tissues into humans is termed xenotransplantation. Recent experiments have shown that the transplantation of organs from genetically modified pigs into baboons can yield moderate to good results and this raises hopes for the future of organ transplantation from pigs to humans. However these, along with existing claims of treatments for diabetes or neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, are still at a very embryonic phase. Apart from a few simple, established procedures such as the treatment of severe burns with human skin cells cultured with mouse cells, xenotransplantation today is only acceptable in very tightly controlled human trials. An advisory group of international experts has recently met at the World Health Organization (WHO) to discuss progress made in xenotransplantation. The main objective of the meeting was to propose ways in which the health agency can assist countries to implement stronger policies to control the practice and enforce quality and safety measures while still promoting further research into its potential uses. The main risk in xenotransplantation is the transmission of diseases. Many serious infections in human history have originated in animals. Once a new pathogen is introduced in one individual, it may spread to the larger population. To manage that risk, several countries

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