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Military Training Limitations Exist Overseas but Are Not Reflected in Readiness Reporting

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Book Id: WPLBN0000109682
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 5.3 MB
Reproduction Date: 2008
Full Text

Title: Military Training Limitations Exist Overseas but Are Not Reflected in Readiness Reporting  
Author:
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Government publications, Legislation., Government Printing Office (U.S.)
Collections: Government Library Collection
Historic
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Publisher: Government Printing Office

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Military Training Limitations Exist Overseas but Are Not Reflected in Readiness Reporting. (n.d.). Military Training Limitations Exist Overseas but Are Not Reflected in Readiness Reporting. Retrieved from http://hawaiilibrary.net/


Excerpt
Excerpt: Rigorous, realistic training is one of the keys to military readiness. All United States military forces, including the approximately 240,000 military personnel stationed outside the continental United States (CONUS), conduct frequent training exercises to hone and maintain their warfighting skills. About 110,000 U.S. military personnel are stationed in Europe and 130,000 in the Pacific, including the states of Hawaii and Alaska. (See app. I for maps showing the two theaters and what units are stationed there and app. II for a map of each location and its major training areas.) Concerned that growing restrictions by host governments are limiting the training opportunities available to U.S. military forces, you requested that we examine a number of issues related to the ability of non- CONUS-based forces to train. Accordingly, our objectives in this report were to assess (1) the types of training constraints that non-CONUS forces face and whether they are likely to increase in the future, (2) the impact these constraints have had on the ability of military units to meet their training requirements and on their reported readiness, and (3) alternatives that exist to increase training opportunities for these forces. As agreed with your office, we included all U.S. forces based outside the 48 contiguous states in our examination, which includes those based in Hawaii and Alaska. A more detailed description of our scope and methodology is included in appendix III.

Table of Contents
Letter 1 Results in Brief 2 Background 3 Forces Face Increasing Training Limitations 5 Constraints Adversely Affect Training, but the Effects Are Not Captured in Readiness Reporting 16 Service and Command Coordination Is Insufficient When Pursuing Training Alternatives 28 Conclusions 34 Recommendations for Executive Action 35 Agency Comments and Our Evaluation 35 Appendix I Location of Major Units and Bases in Europe and the Pacific 37 Appendix II Maps of Individual Countries 41 Appendix III Scope and Methodology 48 Appendix IV Comments from the Department of Defense 51 Tables Table 1: Army Capability Table 20 Table 2: Marine Corps Capability Table 21 Table 3: Navy Capability Table 23 Table 4: Air Force Capability Table 25 Table 5: Units and Locations Visited on This Assignment 49 Figures Figure 1: A Steel Mill Constructed in the Safety Easement Area of the Koon-ni Range 9 Figure 2: A Korean Woman Harvesting Rice on Field Inside the Story Range Complex 10

 

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