World Library  


Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

World Health Organization : Year 2000 ; Communicable Diseases and Emerging Infectious Diseases ; Department of Control, Prevention, And Eradication Gbui, No. 2000.2: Report 3’D World Health Organization Advisory Group Meeting on Buruli Ulcer 1-3 March 2000 World Health Organization Headquarters, Geneva

By David Heymann

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0000170593
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.4 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005
Full Text

Title: World Health Organization : Year 2000 ; Communicable Diseases and Emerging Infectious Diseases ; Department of Control, Prevention, And Eradication Gbui, No. 2000.2: Report 3’D World Health Organization Advisory Group Meeting on Buruli Ulcer 1-3 March 2000 World Health Organization Headquarters, Geneva  
Author: David Heymann
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Health., Public health, Wellness programs
Collections: Medical Library Collection, World Health Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: World Health Organization

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Heymann, D. (n.d.). World Health Organization : Year 2000 ; Communicable Diseases and Emerging Infectious Diseases ; Department of Control, Prevention, And Eradication Gbui, No. 2000.2. Retrieved from http://hawaiilibrary.net/


Description
Medical Reference Publication

Excerpt
INTRODUCTION Background Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer) has rapidly emerged as an important cause of human morbidity around the world. The following countries have reported or suspected cases to date: Africa: Angola, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Togo, Uganda, Sudan; Americas: Bolivia, French Guiana, Mexico, Peru, Suriname Asia: China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Sumatra and Western Pacific: Australia, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea. Buruli ulcer is the third most common mycobacterial disease of non-immunocompromised persons after tuberculosis and leprosy. The mode of transmission is not known. The disease generally affects impoverished inhabitants of remote rural areas with limited access to modern medical care. Most patients present late to the health services. About 70% of those affected are children under the age of 15 years. Buruli ulcer often starts as a painless nodule, which if left untreated, frequently leads to massive skin ulceration followed by debilitating complications. Currently, surgery is the treatment of choice but there are several limitating factors including: 1) inadequate surgical facilities in rural areas in the developing world; 2) high treatment costs; 3) recurrences after surgical treatment; and 4) the risk of transmission of infections such as HIV during surgery. Unfortunately, treatment with antibiotics has thus far been disappointing. The current social and economic burden imposed by Buruli ulcer on patients, their families and the health services is considerable. In response to the growing spread and impact of Buruli ulcer, the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1998 established the Global Buruli Ulcer Initiative (GBUI) with the aims of raising awareness about this disease, mobilizing support to assist affected countries to deal with the disease, promoting and coordinating research, and coordinating the work of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and other partners. In February 1998, the first meeting of the Task Force (now called Advisory Group) consisting of some selected members was held in Geneva. A full membership of the Advisory Group has now been established consisting of 16 people whose expertise covers clinical and surgical intervention, epidemiology and research. The second meeting of this group was held in March 1999 in Geneva.

Table of Contents
CONTENT INTRODUCTION 4 RECOMMENDATIONS Group 1: Research priority areas 7 Group 2: Surveillance, surveys and estimation of disease burden 8 Group 3: Drug treatment 12 Group 4: Training 14 ABSTRACTS GBUI : History of an initiative Dr Mario Raviglione 16 GBUI : Plan of work for 2000 Dr Kingsley Asiedu 18 Buruli ulcer control efforts in the African Region Dr Eugene Nyarko 19 Discussion paper, clinical manifestations of Mycobaterium ulcerans infection Dr John Hayman 22 Summary activities carried out in 1999 for Buruli ulcer control in Benin Dr Augustin Guédénon 24 Monitoring report from Benin Dr Augustin Guédénon 28 Situation of Buruli ulcer control in Côte d’Ivoire Prof. Jean-Marie Kanga, Dr Djatch Edgard Kacou 31 Early detection and treatment of Buruli ulcer Prof. Jean-Marie Kanga 33 Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in French Guyana, the situation at 19 february 2000 Dr Roger Pradinaud 37 Update on Buruli ulcer situation in Ghana Dr George K. Amofah 39

 

Click To View

Additional Books


  • World Health Organization : Technical Re... (by )
  • World Health Organization (Mnh) Maternal... (by )
  • World Health Organization : Year 1990, W... (by )
  • World Health Organization, Weekly Epidem... (by )
  • World Health Organization : Technical Re... (by )
  • World Health Organization ; World Health... (by )
  • World Health Organization : Technical Re... (by )
  • World Health Organization : Report on a ... (by )
  • World Health Organization : Technical Re... (by )
  • The United Nations Joint Programme on Hi... (by )
  • World Health Organization : Regional Off... (by )
  • World Health Organization : Organisation... (by )
Scroll Left
Scroll Right

 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.