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World Health Organization Publication : Year 2003 ; Issue 9241545801 - Appendix: Appendix A ; Lifeguards

By D. Williams

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Book Id: WPLBN0000170968
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.1 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005
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Title: World Health Organization Publication : Year 2003 ; Issue 9241545801 - Appendix: Appendix A ; Lifeguards  
Author: D. Williams
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Health., Public health, Wellness programs
Collections: Medical Library Collection, World Health Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: World Health Organization

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Williams, D. (n.d.). World Health Organization Publication : Year 2003 ; Issue 9241545801 - Appendix. Retrieved from http://hawaiilibrary.net/


Description
Medical Reference Publication

Excerpt
This annex draws upon the extensive experience of the International Life Saving Federation (ILS)1 and comments received during the preparation of these Guidelines. It relates to people who are trained and positioned at recreational water sites to protect water users and who may be paid or voluntary. They may be referred to as lifesavers, lifeguards or given some other title. For simplicity, the term lifeguard has been used throughout this annex. The following sections outline points for consideration when setting up or running a lifeguarding scheme. A.1 Lifeguard qualifications Lifeguards are generally responsible for observation of a beach or recreational water area to anticipate problems and identify an emergency quickly, carry out rescues, give immediate first aid, communicate with swimmers and recreational water users, enforce regulations where appropriate, promote awareness of specific and general hazards and report incidents. Lifeguards should have appropriate training and hold a suitable current qualification. This would normally be from an appropriate and recognized training and assessment agent. Lifeguards should, for example, be competent in lifesaving methods, swimming and the most current methods of resuscitation. Requalification should be undertaken at regular intervals, and practical rescue and resuscitation skills should be practised frequently. Both fitness and technical knowledge are required. Good practice would generally require that records be kept of all training and qualifications and be available for inspection. Lifeguards should have locally-specific knowledge concerning the presence of natural and artificial features, the topography of the area, tides and currents, hazards posed by local animals, the distance to qualified medical assistance, hazards and risks, public relations, crowd management and local operating procedures. Minimum standards for the training of lifeguards have been proposed (http://www.ilsf.org).

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