World Library  


Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian and Pacific Affairs Remarks to the U. S. -Taiwan Defense Industry Conference

By Lawless, Richard

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0000182021
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.2 MB
Reproduction Date: 2008
Full Text

Title: Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian and Pacific Affairs Remarks to the U. S. -Taiwan Defense Industry Conference  
Author: Lawless, Richard
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Government publications, Legislation., Government Printing Office (U.S.)
Collections: Government Library Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Government Printing Office

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Lawless, R. (n.d.). Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Asian and Pacific Affairs Remarks to the U. S. -Taiwan Defense Industry Conference. Retrieved from http://hawaiilibrary.net/


Excerpt
Excerpt: As Vice Minister Chen discussed this morning, it is sometimes difficult to describe and appreciate just how much how democracy is changing the shape and structure of the entire military establishment in Taiwan. The move to full civilian control would be enough to challenge any defense establishment, but at the same time, Taiwan is trying to promote jointness, something our military continues to struggle with since 1984. This is all being accomplished while attempting to execute an ambitious modernization program on a fast track timeline. Vice Minister Chen also brought home to us how many constituencies and problems Taiwan’s military leadership faces. My respect goes out to the civilian and military leaders alike for taking on these objectives, any one of which is a formidable undertaking and accomplishment. While all this is occurring in Taiwan, the security environment in Asia has been well dynamic. I was in Japan on 9/11. Every American and maybe much of the international community remember where they were on 9/11. Before 9/11 we were more complacent. Americans did not believe that our homeland could be attacked. Even while we lived for years under Cold War threats those threats eventually become normalized. The end of the Cold War brought the so called “peace dividend” and decline of the defense budget. Now we find ourselves at war in Afghanistan and in an dozen other locations as we fight Al Quaeda, and we face a potential war in Iraq. 9/11 found us flatfooted both militarily and psychologically.

Table of Contents
NA

 

Click To View

Additional Books


  • Third-Party Involvement in Violent Crime... (by )
  • Before the Senate Armed Services Committ... (by )
  • The Financial Action Task Force: An Over... (by )
  • Shock Waves, Rarefactions, And Sidebar 2... 
  • Questions and Answers about the Redesign 
  • Information System Security (by )
  • Pan-American Advanced Studies Institutes... 
  • Ledger, White and Colored 
  • The Actinide Research Quarterly 
  • Dsaa- Foreign Military Sales Detailed De... 
  • Crs Issue Brief for Congress Received th... (by )
  • Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts—A Continuing Mys... (by )
Scroll Left
Scroll Right

 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.