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Standard Thermodynamic Functions of Gaseous Polyatornic Ions

By Loewenschuss, Aharon

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Book Id: WPLBN0000660067
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Title: Standard Thermodynamic Functions of Gaseous Polyatornic Ions  
Author: Loewenschuss, Aharon
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Language: English
Subject: Technology., Reference materials, Technology and literature
Collections: Techonology eBook Collection
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Loewenschuss, A. (n.d.). Standard Thermodynamic Functions of Gaseous Polyatornic Ions. Retrieved from http://hawaiilibrary.net/


Description
Technical Reference Publication

Excerpt
Introduction: Thermodynamic properties of polyatomic ionic species which exist, with reasonable stability, in aqueous solutions are included in the standard tabulations to a limited extent only. In the JANAF Tables,only a small number of them are covered, whereas Barin and KnackeZ limit themselves to neutral species. On the other hand, the thermodynamic functions of such ions may be considered as quantities of interest in their own right, as well as being important in relation to chemical processes they might undergo like decomposition, association to complex ions, solvation in general, or hydration in particular.

Table of Contents
Contents 1 . Introduction .............. ...................................... 63 2 . The Calculation .................................................... 63 3. Tables of Thermodynamic Functions .................. 65 4 . Specific Comments ............................................... 87 5 . Acknowledgments ...... ; .................................. 89 6 . References ............................................................ 89 List of Tablesa) Diatomic Iorls 1 . Hydroxide. OH- .......................................... 2. Hydrosulfide. HS- ....................................... 3. Hydroselenide. HSe- ................................... 4 . * Superoxide. 0; ........................................... 5 . Peroxide. 0: - .............................................. 6 . . Hypochlorite. C10- ..................................... 7 . Hypobromite. BrO; .................................... 8 . Nitrosonium. NO+ ...................................... 9.* Vanadyl (IV). v02+. .................................. 9a . Antimony1 (111). SbO+ ............................... 10 . Cyanide. CN- .............................................. 11 . Disulfide. S: - ............................................... Tables for which there arecomments in Sec . 4 are marked with an asterisk after their number . The tables are numbered in concordance with Ref . 4, hence in some cases numbering such as 25.25a. 25b. etc., occurs in order to accommodate ions which have not been included in the tables of Ref . 4 . 01987 by the U . S . Secretary of Commerce on behalfof the United States . This copyright is assigned to the American Institute of Physics and the American Chemical Society . Reprints available from ACS; see Reprints List at back of issue . 12 . Dimercury (I ). Hg: + .................................. Triatomic Ions 13 . Azide. N; .................................................... 14. Trisulfide. S:- .............................................. 15. Tribromide. Br; .......................................... 16. Triiodide. I; ................................................ 17. Hydrogendifluoride. HF; ........................... 18 . Hydroperoxide. HO; .................................. 19.* Metaborate. BO; ..................................... 20. Metaaluminate. A10; ................................. 2 1. Nitroniurn. NO,+ ......................................... 22 . Nitrite. NO; ................................................ 23. Chlorite. C10; ............................................. 23a . Bromite. BrO; ............................................. 23b . Metaarsenite. AsO; .................................. 24 . Dioxovanadium (V). VO; .......................... 25 . Dioxouranium(V1). UO; + ......................... 25a.* Dioxoneptunium(V1). NpO: ' ................... 25b.* Dioxoplutonium(V1). PuO: ..................... + 25c.* Dioxoamericium(VI). AmO: ................... + 26.* Dioxouranium (V). UO: ............................ 26a.* Dioxoneptunium (V ). NpO: ...................... 26b.* Dioxoplutonium (V). PuO: ....................... 26c. * Dioxoamericium (V ) . AmO: ..................... 27 . Cyanate . NCO- ........................................... 28 . Thiocyanate. SCN- ..................................... 29 . Dichloroargentate( I). AgCI; ..................... . . ..................... 30 Dibromoargentate(1) AgBr; 3 1.* Diiodoargentate. AgI; ................................ 0047~2689/87/010061~30/$06.00 61 J . Phys . Chem . Ref . Data.Vol . 16. No . 1. 1987

 

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