World Library  


Add to Book Shelf
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Book

The Water Footprint of Indonesian Provinces Related to the Consumption of Crop Products : Volume 6, Issue 4 (24/07/2009)

By Bulsink, F.

Click here to view

Book Id: WPLBN0003986984
Format Type: PDF Article :
File Size: Pages 23
Reproduction Date: 2015

Title: The Water Footprint of Indonesian Provinces Related to the Consumption of Crop Products : Volume 6, Issue 4 (24/07/2009)  
Author: Bulsink, F.
Volume: Vol. 6, Issue 4
Language: English
Subject: Science, Hydrology, Earth
Collections: Periodicals: Journal and Magazine Collection, Copernicus GmbH
Historic
Publication Date:
2009
Publisher: Copernicus Gmbh, Göttingen, Germany
Member Page: Copernicus Publications

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Hoekstra, A. Y., Booij, M. J., & Bulsink, F. (2009). The Water Footprint of Indonesian Provinces Related to the Consumption of Crop Products : Volume 6, Issue 4 (24/07/2009). Retrieved from http://hawaiilibrary.net/


Description
Description: Twente Water Centre, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands. National water use accounts are generally limited to statistics on water withdrawals in the different sectors of economy. They are restricted to blue water accounts related to production, thus excluding (a) green and grey water accounts, (b) accounts of internal and international virtual water flows and (c) water accounts related to consumption. This paper shows how national water-use accounts can be extended through an example for Indonesia. The study quantifies interprovincial virtual water flows related to trade in crop products and assesses the green, blue and grey water footprint related to the consumption of crop products per Indonesian province. The study shows that the average water footprint in Indonesia insofar related to consumption of crop products is 1131 m3/cap/yr, but provincial water footprints vary between 859 and 1895 m3/cap/yr. Java, the most water-scarce island, has a net virtual water import and the most significant external water footprint. This large external water footprint is releasing the water scarcity on this island. There are two alternative routes to reduce the overall water footprint of Indonesia. On the one hand, it may be reduced by promoting wise crop trade between provinces – i.e. trade from places with high to places with low water efficiency. On the other hand, the water footprint can be reduced by improving water efficiency in those places that currently have relatively low efficiency, which equalises production efficiencies and thus reduces the need for imports and enhances the opportunities for exports. In any case, trade will remain necessary to supply food to the most densely populated areas where water scarcity is highest (Java).

Summary
The water footprint of Indonesian provinces related to the consumption of crop products

Excerpt
ADB: Indonesia: strategic vision for agriculture and rural development, Asian Development Bank, Manila, Philippines, 2006.; BMG: Climatic data from weather stations over Indonesia, Badan Meteorologi dan Geofisika, Jakarta, Indonesia, 2008.; Allen, R. G., Pereira, L. S., Raes, D., and Smith, M.: Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelines for computing crop water requirements, FAO Irrigation and Drainage Paper 56, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, Italy, 1998.; BPS: Land utilization by province 2005 (ha), Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, online available at: www.bps.go.id/sector/agri/pangan/table12.shtml, 2008a.; BPS: Production and Area by crop 1995–2006, Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, online available at: www.bps.go.id/sector/agri/index.html, 2008b.; BPS: Daily per capita consumption of protein 2002–2006, Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, online available at: www.bps.go.id/sector/consumpexp/table1.shtml, 2008c.; FAO: FAOSTAT database, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, online available at: faostat.fao.org, 2008e.; FAO: Technical conversion factors for agricultural commodities, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, Italy, 2008f.; BPS: Population of Indonesia by Province 1971, 1980, 1990, 1995 and 2000, Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, online available at: www.bps.go.id/sector/population/table1.shtml, 2008d.; Chapagain, A. K. and Hoekstra, A. Y.: Water footprints of nations, Value of Water Research Report Series No. 16, UNESCO-IHE, Delft, The Netherlands, 2004.; Chapagain, A. K., Hoekstra, A. Y., Savenije, H. H. G., and Gautam, R.: The water footprint of cotton consumption: An assessment of the impact of worldwide consumption of cotton products on the water resources in the cotton producing countries, Ecol. Econ., 60, 186–203, 2006.; Chapagain, A. K. and Orr, S.: UK Water Footprint: The impact of the UK's food and fibre consumption on global water resources, WWF-UK, Godalming, UK, 2008.; EPA: List of drinking water contaminants: ground water and drinking water, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, USA, 2005.; FAO: Irrigation in Asia in figure, Water Reports 18, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, Italy, 1999.; FAO: Fertilizer use by crop in Indonesia, Land and Plant Nutrition Management Service, Land and Water Development Division, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, Italy, 2005.; FAO: CLIMWAT database, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, online available at: www.fao.org/nr/water/infores_databases_climwat.html, 2008a.; FAO: AQUASTAT database, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, online available at: www.fao.org/nr/water/aquastat/main/index.stm, 2008b.; FAO: Fertistat database, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, online available at: www.fao.org/ag/agl/fertistat, 2008d.; FAO: CROPWAT model, Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, online available at: www.fao.org/nr/water/infores_databases_cropwat.html, 2008c.; Hoekstra, A. Y.: Virtual water trade: Proceedings of the International Expert Meeting on Virtual Water Trade, Value of Water Research Report Series No. 12, UNESCO-IHE, Delft, The Netherlands, 2003.; Hoekstra, A. Y. and Chapagain, A. K.: Water footprints of nations: water use by people as a function of their consumption pattern, Water Resour. Manag., 21(1), 35–48, 2007.; Hoekstra, A. Y. and Chapagain, A. K.: Globalization of water: Sharing the planet's freshwater resources, Blackwell Publishing, Ox

 

Click To View

Additional Books


  • Three-dimensional Monitoring of Soil Wat... (by )
  • Use of Envisat Asar Global Monitoring Mo... (by )
  • What Drives Flood Trends Along the Rhine... (by )
  • Opposite Distribution Pattern of Streamb... (by )
  • Future Changes in Mekong River Hydrology... (by )
  • Recharge Estimation and Soil Moisture Dy... (by )
  • Drought Risk Assessments of Water Resour... (by )
  • Temporal Variability of Subsurface Storm... (by )
  • A New Perspective on the Spatio-temporal... (by )
  • Joint Inference of Groundwater-recharge ... (by )
  • Multivariate Return Periods in Hydrology... (by )
  • Statistical Analysis to Characterize Tra... (by )
Scroll Left
Scroll Right

 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Hawaii eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.